Tuesday, September 24, 2013

X-type heater oxygen sensor codes: P0031, P0032, P0037, P0038, P0051, P0052, P0057, P0058, P0131, P0132, P0133, P0137, P0138, P0140, P0151, P0152, P0153, P0157, P0158, P0160, P1646 and P1647

If you got any of these codes P0031, P0032, P0037, P0038, P0051, P0052, P0057, P0058, P0131, P0132, P0133, P0137, P0138, P0140, P0151, P0152, P0153, P0157, P0158, P0160, P1646 or P1647 let me tell you straight up that you most likely need an oxygen sensor. On top of that if you need one (and you haven't changed the other ones) you probably want to change all four for two reasons:
  1. When one goes out, the others are quick to follow and you don't want to be wasting time
  2. Oxygen sensors become deteriorated over time and their values are not as perfect as a brand new one and this hurts fuel economy and power.
When changing the oxygen sensors it is very important to stick to the brand that the car originally came with, because if you put a Denso (when you had let's say a Bosch) the resistance might be slightly different and might cause a check engine light. This is a lesson I learned the hard way. Just because it fits doesn't mean it will keep the MIL off.

Links for correct oxygen sensors to buy:
Keep in mind that by buying from the links you'll be helping this blog with a couple of pennies :D

In your X-type, the oxygen sensors in the first bank are somewhat complicated to change because of the way the engine is set up, but the ones on bank two are just a bit annoying, but very possible to do. First, if you want and are somewhat mechanically inclined, you can do the official tests to make sure the oxygen sensor is at fault (even though the 99% possibility of the code being caused by an oxygen sensor you are stubborn like me):

First, identify your code, you'll be working with the sensor corresponding to your code:
  • P0031 and P0032, P0131, P0132, P0133 and P1646 correspond to the first bank upstream oxygen sensor
  • P0037, P0038, P0137, P0138 and P0140 correspond to the first bank downstream oxygen sensor
  • P0051, P0052, P0151, P0152, P0153 and P1647 correspond to the second bank upstream oxygen sensor
  • P0057, P0058, P0157, P0158 and P0160 correspond to the second bank downstream oxygen sensor
After you now which sensor you are working with, you need to find the connector in the car. There are two sets of two connectors in our x-type:
  • Bank one set is next to your brake fluid reservoir
  • Bank two set is next to your battery (you might need a flash light to spot these)
Next to your battery (bank 2)

By your brake fluid reservoir (bank 1)
The grey connector belongs to the upstream and the black connector belongs to the downstream. So, now you got your suspected sensor you need a Digital Multimeter (if you are a car enthusiast this is a must!) and do a basic resistance check (watch video below if you don't know how) between the resistance terminals.


You should read from 3 Ohms to 20 Ohms, if you don't (anything like OL or some high fluctuating resistance) then you have a bad oxygen sensor and it needs to be replaced.
Downstream disconnected
One end of the meter to the top left of the above pic and one lead connected to the right (they might not connect i.e. you might have to hold them). But like I said, 99% chance is your oxygen sensor if you have this code and they've never been replaced.

2 comments:

  1. Hi there,
    Just noticed your video isn't loading on any browser that I use. Are you able to paste a link to it?
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  2. Any work on a vehicle's radio or reproducer needs testing resistance, as scant Ohms can cause a speaker to blow out. additional advanced digital multimeters built for business and industrial comes supply further check choices mensuration capacitance, frequency, circuit continuity, inductance, and even temperature Garatools.com.

    ReplyDelete